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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 402 (some duplicates have been removed)
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
's a mess and owes 18 billion dollars from hurricane katrina. i mean, this is an agency that cannot manage itself. the inspector general wrote a long report last year saying the agency is mismanaged, it doesn't have systems in place that can talk to states. they can't talk to each other, they don't have the right computers in place and let me tell you, they are managing more disasters all the time. president obama has called more disasters than any other president in the last 20 years. fema is not the organization. give it to the local states, they're the people who can make these decisions and spend the money wisely. >> neil: i don't dismiss the role of a federal presence disasters like these, but when bottled water can't arrive to a site and folks supposed to weather the storm close, at antithesis of what you're supposed to adopt and send e-mails to people who don't have powers and texts to phone to people who don't have phone service, you can't make this stuff up. >> that's the problem with bureaucracy and not letting states handle this. if anybody can more money, go out to staten islan
there is no drinking water. >> neil: you and i sxi can remember with katrina, big difference in variety of levels. it was the same immediate response that things were under control. the famous heck of a job brownie comment that prompted the initial view, things are under control and not so bad. then we started getting the images, we started seeing more and more. it was not under control. we're seeing the initial response on the part of president and governor christie and mayor bloomberg and governor of new jersey is still speaking to reporters in hoboken. residents who are affected in these areas, you are talking a good game but it ain't happening to me. that is when it turns the tide. what do you see happening now if this lingers much longer? >> reporter: first of all, thank you for covering this story. i have been watching other stations, they are not covering this station. a lot of americans saw the instant response, this was a storm that was dealt with and very professional and competent manner and fema and state. now, we are finding out thanks in large part that is not the case. i think a lo
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
resources in a way that makes the networks run well, i think if you look back at the hurricane katrina recommendations, they were for voluntary, flexible framework. we did not disagree with the goal of the fcc to keep the networks running. that is in every carrier's best interest. it is how you go about doing that. for us, when you look a storm of this magnitude, is having the ability to react, move assets around. carriers have to put in thousands of feet of cables to drag cables of to the rooftops to power generators so that we could have cell sites working. >> let's go back to katrina in 2005. what investment have wireless companies done to improve the reliability? >> in every instance possible, putting in backup power. we put towers in on church steeples, on the side of buildings in major metropolitan areas. in closets within buildings. it becomes difficult in certain areas to have backup power. the carriers try to put in batteries were the cannot put in generators. where they can put in generators, the put in as much fuel as allowed. when you are working with building codes or resi
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
a will surpass those fom hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countlessse businesses hurt, others could see a boost.se erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed treesand damage to transportation networks, it could takandays-- if not weeks,i to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be thets most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the mt serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will lielyly surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they won't get back. insurance companies will have tu make big payouts, which will likely mean hiher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predic
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005. i'm not, again not comparing the gravity of the two event but i am comparing the immediate official response over the handling of these events. what i'm also noting is the distinct difference in the media coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. whether it will be an issue a few days from now. pat? >> it could be. what we are seeing, now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake pass, with the marathon and by the way, i have yet to see him in staten island. >> he has not been there yet. >> doesn't it tell you everything, the people you interviewed said. there is a political effort to run the clock out. with the media, like they've done on libya. just like they've hidden the truth about libya, hide the truth about this in the service of obama's campaign. let's get it straight. >> fox was the first camera crew to go to staten island to show this and others in the media have gone. you can't ignore it. >> there is a disconnect, the politician want to say everything is okay. rereality is this afternoon. what will they do, h
this before, during katrina, even with your protest, with president public we have problems do not get cocky, we have a handle on it, i am getting the same sense with this storm. i don't think anything approaching the magnitude of katrina thank good but the treatment of officials and the way they back slap each other when the problem is still very much at hand, that is similar. what do you thick of that? >>guest: that is similar and it is absolutely wrong. what i see based on my experience there must be a lost miscommunication going on between state, local, and federal officials. if that is the case and let me tell you why i think it is the case, if you have food distribution, warming centers, and fema centers where you can fine up for the relief housed in the same place, and family shuts that down and no one is communicating that to the victims and the disaster area someone is not communicating with someone and that is serious. >>neil: thank you for your insight, michael. the stuff gets coordinated and sometimes botched when everyone is not on the same page. michael brown was warning about
, this storm costs upwards of $50 billion, making it the second costliest storm after katrina. but atlantic city studios are allowed re-entry today. 95 sandy related deaths are reported in the u.s., including two brothers, ages 2 the and 4, and new york city staten island tt he centepicenter of the casu today. many are remaining powerless and they're not homeless, as well. and residents say the response is coming a bit too late. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help immediately. >> msnbc's richard lui is now in staten island with more for us. richard, good morning. >> thomas, very good morning to you. we're right here by the bay. several marinas in staten island and this corner has been hurt so much. if you lived in this area, you would have 30, 40-foot tall yachts sitting in your front yard. i was speaking with representative michael grim a little earlier. this is his district. and i asked him about the shelters. where are people going and what do they need? this is what he told me. >> they need
. so huge. and to compare it to katrina, katrina lost more lives. we lost too many lives, but not close to katrina. but in other ways it's much more devastating than katrina. right now in new york 305,000 homes are seriously damaged or gone. kirsten showed the pictures of some of them that are just gone by fire because the water systems failed, and the wind -- then the electrical systems got shorted; fire, wind. and the, so 305,000 homes seriously damaged or gone. just in new york up to now, there are going to be more that we'll learn about because the flooding is still there in lots of the basements. these are low-lying houses. there were 214,000 total homes gone in katrina of the same level of damage. businesses, 265,000 -- this is just new york. bob will talk about, and frank talked about new jersey which has similar levels of damage. in katrina 18,000 businesses. because of the density of the population, it is a much greater economic impact on our region, of course, and on the nation. than otherwise. so despite all this pain we can't entirely fault those who came before us for build
to be thrown out. and since you're going to hear the memory of katrina invoked more and more in the coming days, like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island. ann curry has more. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend for yourself kind of thing. >> reporter: on the streets hit with debris, where the death toll has gone up to at least 19, today, the fury was seen live on television. >> but you need to come here a
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
it was obama's katrina, which it is. the jobs report is up. we will check in with karl rove and look at predictions from others as the outcome of tuesday is now pretty much at hand. joining me with reaction to all of this, radio talk show host willie billy cunningham. his radio show is heard nationally across the country on sunday nights. sir, welcome back. ju you are a great american. >> sean hannity, how are you? >> sean: after the photo op,. billy cunningham where does president obama fly? to vegas. meanwhile, it it is beginning to freeze in the northeast. people don't have heat, electricity. the gas stations that are open people are waiting six hours or long are to be able to get gas. he comes to town. he hugs chris christie, photo op and then heads off to vegas. your reaction? >> i would say a few things. number one, i think this is obama's katrina in which he is showing a complete lack of compassion. i can recall a speech he gave in denver in front of 70,000 fans in which he said if you elect me the winds will stop blowing and the oceans will not rise. what happened to the anoi
well. i think if you look back at the hurricane katrina recommendations before the fcc acted, those recommendations were for a voluntary, flexible framework. and so that's what we were pushing. we don't disagree with the goal of the fcc to keep the networks running, of course we don't. that's in every carrier's best interests, it's in the industry's best interests. it's just how do you go about doing this. and so for us when you look at a storm of this magnitude, it's having the ability to react, to move assets around. we had carriers that had to put in, you know, thousands of feet of power cables to drag, you know, cables up to the rooftop to power generators so that we could have cell sites working. >> host: well, let's go back to katrina in '05. what kind of investment have wireless companies done to improve their reliability during such emergencies? >> guest: sure. so you see carriers in every instance where it's possible putting in back-up power, and you can imagine instances where it's not. we put towers in on church steeples, we put them on the side of buildings in mayor metr
repetitive. it dulls the ears. here he doesn't have to mention bush. it's in everyone's head. katrina is recalled with the im. talk about fema, people think about the bush legacy. and so, he doesn't have make those contrastic splits, never mind about mitt romney, that helps him because he's doing stuff and it's all out there without the effort. >> you get the unearned assist from michael brown coming out. >> we'll talk about brownie. >> you couldn't ask for that. you couldn't make that bet. >> but there's karen welcome. hi. >> welcome to the show. i want to say, it's not just the presidential thing. it's also -- there's incredibly moving -- let's not forget the human toll this storm's taken. >> absolutely. >> the images of the president consoling americans in the wake of this massive disaster are incredibly powerful images. and what you heard in the president, what you heard from the president on the stump just now was empathy, this sense that he is fighting for you, that you have a seat at the table, middle class, working class americans, that he is there for you. and that fundamenta
, the tales it could tell. listen to this, one that has gone back and forth from louisiana, katrina, and new york for 9/11 and back. now back again the brotherhood of firefighters that is straight ahead. >> those are two cities that share tragedy, have tragedy in common. katrina down there. 9/11 up here. now another one with sandy. so that -- the bond, the fire truck, represents that. >>> also, we'll lighten the mood a little bit in "the skinny," she says, maybe not too much. she is going to be fine. talking about brooke burke from abc's "dancing with the stars," when the word cancer is involved we'll have to send her our very best thoughts and warm wishes. details of her condition. she is going to be okay the important thing. stay tuned for details coming up on that in "the skinny". >> what her doctors are telling her. our prayers and thoughts go out to her and her family. first, victims and relatives of those who died were in the courtroom as a judge reaffirmed that jared loughner would never again be a free man. >>> part of a plea deal, loughner was sentenced to seven consecutive life ter
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
. >> eric: may i bring -- >> bob -- holdon. >> kimberly: by the way, what happened to bush and katrina? did they do the same thing? it's okay there, but not here. being politically expedient again? >> bob: there are 77 people dead. romney and his people talk about how obama was not prepared. >> greg: you talk about climate change. >> eric: let me do this. i'll bring this back to why i put the two things in the same segment, bob. here is why. we gave him $1 trillion. the administration $1 trillion to beef up the infrastructure. they spent $1 trillion making the grid. burying the grid underground so that every time it's 50-mile-per-hour wind we don't have half the country losing power. that would have been a good use of stimulus money. better use. >> bob: bury new jersey under the ground in four years? >> eric: let me put it this way. $1 trillion closer to getting it done. what did we get with the money we spent? >> kimberly: nothing. >> bob: republicans have to think of something besides sandy to make a case in the final four days. >> greg: that is the point. >> dana: romney did not. what he
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 402 (some duplicates have been removed)